Information about the ships on which ancestors and their families immigrated.

Between 1600 and 1700.
The 'Mayflower' arrived in Plymouth Colony on 21 December 1620 See the complete passengerslist
Family members among the passengers were.
James Chilton with his wife Susannah and their daughter Mary. Their daughter Isabel came later.
Francis Cooke with his son John.
Thomas Rogers and his son Joseph.
Susannah White with her husband William and two children.
Edward Winslow with his wife Elisabeth and his brother Gilbert.

The 'Fortune' arrived in Plymouth Colony on 9 November 1621. (see the complete passengerlist)
Family members among the passengers were.
The 'Anne' and the 'Little James' arrived in Plymouth Colony in July or August 1623 (see also the reconstructed passengerlist). Family members among the passengers were.
Hester Cooke with her children Jane, Jacob and Hester.
Margaret Hicks with her children Samuel, Lydia and Phoebe.
Ellen Adams.
Sarah Warren with her mother and sisters.

The 'Eendracht' sailed on 25 January 1623/24 from Amsterdam to New Amsterdam.
The 'Handmaid' arrived in Plymouth Colony on 29 October 1630.
John Eddy with his wife Amy.
After twelve weeks at sea, the Handmaid docked at Plymouth with about 60 passengers. 1

The 'Mary and John' arrived in Dorchester in 1630.
The Ships arrived in New England in April 1634. Among the passengers were.
John Barnard from Ipswich to New England, together with his wife Mary and two children: Fayth Newell, aged 14, and Henry Haward, aged 7.
Rowland Stebbins from Ipswich with his wife Sarah and their children Thomas, Sarah, Elizabeth and John.

The 'Hopewell' arrived in New England in 1635.
Edward Clapp with his wife Prudence.

The 'Truelove' arrived in Dorchester in 1635.
Richard Hawes with his wife Anne and their children Anne and Obediah.

The 'Elizabeth and Ann' arrived in New England in 1635.
Marjorie Washburn with her children John and Philip.

The 'Increase' left London around 15 April 1635 and arrived in New England the end of May.
Thomas Kilbourne from London with his wife Frances en their children Margaret, Lydia, Mary, Frances and John.
John Root with his brother.


Between 1700 and 1800. No family members seem to have immigrated within this time period.

Between 1800 and 1900.
The barque 'Dank Caasliest' arrived in New York City on 18 June 1847.
R. J. Schuring from Rotterdam with her children Jacob, Jurjen, Aaltje, Marinus, Geesje and Klaas.

The bark Dank Caasliest was a 345 ton sailboat which came to New York from Rotterdam on June 4, 1847. The “Dank Caasliest” carried mostly Dutch speaking Germans (sic!), many of whom settled in Graafschap, Michigan. Captain of the ship was W. Postma. (http://www.macatawa.org/~devries/Dank.htm ).

The 'Doggersbank' arrived in New York City on 4 June 1847.
Johan ten Bruggencate with his cousin Thomas.
See the passenger list transcription.

The Bremen ship 'Admiral' arrived in New York City on 3 February 1852.
Wilhelm Seidler from Bremen.
The Bremen ship 'Admiral', Carl Wieting, master, arrived at New York, 50 days from Rotterdam, with 255 passengers. This vessel was built by the shipbuilder Johann Lange, of Vegesack/Grohn, and launched on 23 September 1848. 320 Commerzlasten/744 tons; 39,8 x 9,8 x 6 meters (length x beam x depth of hold). Original owners were the Bremen firms of Hermann Fr. Weinhagen (1/3) and Julius Schaer & Co (2/3--in 1851, 1/3 transferred to Georg Heinr. Wilh. Schaer); the vessel was managed by H. F. Weinhagen. 20 October 1848, maiden voyage, Carl Wieting, master, to New Orleans. The ADMIRAL was engaged in the transport of emigrants to North America and was commanded by Carl Wieting until the early 1860's, when he was succeeded by Johann Friedrich Haeslop. In the early 1870's, the Bremen firm of Anton Fr. Ad. Schaer became managers of the ship, being succeeded in 1878 by Reck & Boyes, who installed H. N. Lauer, from Vegesack, as the last master of the vessel under the German flag. In the mid-1880's, the ship was sold to Westergaard & Hannevig (later Westergaard & Co.), of Christiania, Norway. On 1 April 1891, bound in ballast from Rio de Janeiro to Halifax, the ADMIRAL, now rigged as a bark, was stranded in the vicinity of Ocean City, Maryland, not far from Philadelphia, and became a total loss.
Sources: Peter-Michael Pawlik, Von der Weser in die Welt; Die Geschichte der Segelschiffe von Weser und Lesum und ihrer Bauwerften 1770 bis 1893, Schriften des Deutschen Schiffahrtsmuseums, Bd. 33 (Hamburg: Kabel, c1993), pp. 215, no. 200, and 216 (oil painting by Oltmann Jaburg, 1872)]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 30 September 1998].

The 'Hansa' arrived in New York City on 9 October 1854.
Amalia Deizsler with her sister Maria.
'Hansa' was built by Wm H. Webb, New York in 1847 as the "United States" for the American, Black Ball Line of transatlantic sailing packets. She was an 1,857 gross ton steamship, length 244.6ft x beam 48ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, wooden construction, paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 50-2nd class passengers. Launched on 20/8/1847, she sailed from New York on her maiden voyage to Liverpool on 8/4/1848 (One round voyage). On 10/6/1848 she commenced her first voyage from New York to Southampton and Havre. Her second voyage on this route started on 5/8/1848, and on 6/12/1848 she sailed on her last voyage from New York to Southampton, Havre (dep 9/1/1849), Southampton, Halifax and New York (arr 5/2/1849). In 1849 she was sold and converted to a warship. On 31/5/1849 she sailed from New York for Liverpool where she was renamed "Hansa" and became a member of the German Confederation Navy. In 1853 she was bought by Fritze & Lehmkuhl of Bremen who refitted her as a merchant ship. She sailed on her first voyage for these owners from Bremen to New York on 30/8/1853 and on 17/10/1854 commenced her last sailing on this route (4 Round voyages). On 24/3/1855 she left London for the Black Sea where she became a troop transport for the Crimean War, and on 18/9/1855 returned to the UK. On 9/4/1857 she commenced a single round voyage from Bremen to New York and in 1858 was sold to the Galway Line of Ireland, renamed "Indian Empire" and rebuilt to 2,516 tons. She made two transatlantic crossings for these owners (commencing 19/6/1858 and 28/9/1858) from Galway to New York. On 24/7/1861 she was damaged by fire at Deptford, London and was laid up in Victoria Dock, London, where she sank on 4 May 1866. Bron: North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.194.

The 'R. L. Gillchrest'
Therese Deisler to New York on 31 May 1855.

The 'Princes Amalia' travelled on ]D] from Amsterdam to Batavia.
The Princes Amalia was owned by the Stoomvaart Maatschappij 'Nederland'
Build in 1874, in 1906 sold to British shipbreakers, 1907 resold to Italy and scrapped (http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/nederland.htm).


Between 1900 and 2000.
The 'Numidian' arrived in New York City on 18 November 1904.
The SS 'Astoria' arrived in New York City on 21 August 1904.
Asikova Rakstein with her children RG:Witness.

The SS 'Teutonic' arrived in Quebec on 20 May 1911.
Jan Hendrik Gast with his wife Maria Willemina and his son Albertus.

The SS 'Francesca' arrived in New York City on 4 January 1906.
David Reichstein with his wife Esther and son Simon from Triest.
Chaje Sure Senderovitch with her daughter Ruchel and sister-in-law Ruchel Senderovitch from Triest.
The SS 'Francesca' was built by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow in 1905 for the Austrian company, Unione Austriaca. She was a 4946 gross ton vessel, length 359.8ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 50-2nd, and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 2/6/1905, she left Trieste on 27/8/1905 on her maiden voyage to Naples, Palermo and New York. She did 17 round voyages on this service, commencing her last run on 13/3/1908 and was then transferred to the South America service. In 1919 she went to the Italian Cosulich Line for whom she did one round voyage from Genoa - Naples - New York commencing 22/5/1919. She was scrapped in 1926. (Source: Posted to the Emigration- Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 9 September 1997)
4,946 gross tons, length 359.8ft x beam 48.0ft (109,65m x 14,63m), one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 30-1st, 50-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Built by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by J. K. Kincaid & Co, Greenock), she was launched on 2nd Jun.1905 for Unione Austriaca, Trieste which was at that time Austrian. Her maiden voyage started 17th Aug.1905 when she left Trieste for New York and on 7th May 1908 she started her first Trieste - South America sailing.In 1910 her cargo holds were refrigerated to carry frozen meat from Argentina and in 1919 when Trieste became Italian she transferred to Cosulich Line. She was scrapped in 1926. (
South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, contains photo).

The SS 'Friedrich der Grosse' arrived in New York City on 20 December 1906.
Michal Suchowacki from Bremen.
The SS 'Friedrich der Grosse' was owned by North German Lloyd.
On August 1, 1896, the ship was launched and christened 'Friedrich der Grosse' in Stettin. The fitting out commenced immediately afterwards and the ship had her quadruple expansion engines installed which were geared to two propellers. This combination would make the Friedrich der Grosse capable of maintaining a service speed of 14.5 knots. This certainly did not make her the fastest ship on the seas, but the distinction of being the largest German ship attracted lots of patriotic Germans.
The Friedrich der Grosse was completed on November 11 that year, and was ready for her maiden voyage about a week later. Her first crossing went to Australia where many ships were needed during this time due to the massive emigration. The Friedrich der Grosse did not have a strict schedule on where her permanent route was supposed to be, and she was used either on the Australian run or on the North Atlantic, depending on where she was needed.
In 1902 the Friedrich der Grosse went out of service temporarily in order to be slightly refitted. After the reconstruction, which was completed the same year, the ship emerged with an impressive 10,696 gross tons compared to the 10,531 gross tons the ship had had when she entered service.
The ship was interned in the US during World War I, and with all the German ships in American ports was seized by the US Navy when the US entered the War. She was then transformed into a troop transport and shipped American soldiers to Europe, bearing her new military name Huron. In 1919 she was renamed City of Honolulu, and put on the Hawaiian service. On October 12 the same year, the City of Honolulu was 400 miles from Los Angeles on a return voyage from Honolulu when she suddenly caught fire. The fire spread quickly, passengers and crew had to leave the ship. The City of Honolulu stayed afloat until the fire was out, but she was nothing but a burnt-out shell. Five days later the US transport Thomas arrived at the scene with orders to sink the ship. The remains of this once so impressive German ship sank to the bottom after some perfect hits, and there she has remained ever since. (
Source: ).

The SS 'German' arrived in Southampton on 15 March 1907.
Bessie Levison from Durban, SA, with her daughter Mary Finn and Mary's children Harry Finn and Edith Finn. There is a discrepancy here, but I assume that a mistake has been made somewhere, as the whole group that arrives in New York is here together on this ship. Either the arrival date for the Durban Castle, or the departure date for the New York is wrong.
The 'German' was owned by Union-Castle Mail S.S. Company.
The 'German' was a 6,763 gross ton passenger / cargo ship, length 440.3ft x beam 53.2ft, one funnel, two masts, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 76-1st, 105-2nd and 98-3rd class passengers.
Built 1898 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Union SS Co., she collided with and sank Wilson Line's s/s CORSO the same year in the River Elbe. Shortly afterward, she collided with the sailing barque SAVERNAKE with minor damage. She arrived at Capetown from Southampton on her maiden voyage on 29th Jan.1899. 1900 came under the ownership of the Union-Castle Mail S.S. Company. In 1914 she was converted into a hospital ship with 423 beds and because of anti-German sentiment was renamed GLENGORM CASTLE.. 1921 Among the last hospital ships to be decommissioned, but apart from one mail voyage to South Africa, she continued in Government service as a troopship.In 1925 she returned to intermediate service for Union-Castle Line and in 1930 was scrapped at Rotterdam.
Source.

The SS 'Philadelphia' arrived in New York City on 24 March 1907.
Bessie Levison with her sister Mary, and Mary's children Harry and Edith.
The 'Philadelphia' was owned by the American Line.
The second CITY OF PARIS was a 10,499 gross ton ship, length 527.6ft x beam 63.2ft, clipper bows, three funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), twin screw, speed 20 knots. Accommodation for 540-1st, 200-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by J.& G. Thomson, Glasgow, she was launched for the Inman Line of Liverpool on 23rd Oct.1888 and started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown and New York on 3rd Apr.1889. She made several record voyages to New York and in 1893 went to the American Line and was renamed PARIS. She sailed between New York and Southampton under the American flag and for a short while in 1898 became the US armed cruiser YALE before resuming her previous name and service. Rebuilt in 1899 with two funnels, she was then renamed PHILADELPHIA and continued New York - Southampton / Liverpool sailings. In 1918 she became the US transport HARRISBURG, and in 1920 reverted to PHILADELPHIA. Sold to the New York - Naples SS Co in 1922, she sailed from New York to Gibraltar and Naples where she was seized for debt and was sold and scrapped the following year. Source: North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.245.

The SS 'St. Louis' arrived in New York City on 24 March 1907.
John Levison from Cherbourg.
The St. Louis was owned by American Line.
The St. Louis was an 11,629 gross ton ship, built by W.Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia in 1894 for the American Line. Her sister ship was the "St. Paul". Her details were - length 535.5ft x beam 63ft, straight stem, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 350-1st, 220-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/11/1894, she sailed from New York on her maiden voyage to Southampton on 5/6/1895. She started her last Southampton - New York crossing on 16/4/1898 before being used as an auxiliary cruiser for use in the Spanish-American war. On 12/10/1898 she resumed New York - Southampton sailings and in 1903 was fitted with new boilers and had her funnels heightened. In 1913 she was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers only and on 15/7/1914 sailed on her last Southampton - Cherbourg - Queenstown - New York voyage. Transferred to the New York - Liverpool service on 31/7/1914 until April 1918 when she commenced her last Liverpool - New York crossing, she then became the US government ship "Louisville". On 9/1/1920 she was damaged by fire while being refitted for the New York - Southampton service, and was sold as an exhibition ship but not used as such. On 20/5/1924 she left New York under tow for Genoa where she was scrapped.
Source: North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.943, Posted to TheShipsList by Ted Finch - 28 January 1998.

The SS 'Koning Willem I' left Amsterdam for Batavia in February 1907. The same ship brought Rosalia and her children back to Amsterdam in 1912.
Mar Broekman from Amsterdam with his wife Rosalia and son Juup.
Rosalia Voss from Batavia with two children.
The 'Koning Willem I' was owned by the Stoomvaart Maatschappij 'Nederland'.
On 13 August 1897 the mailship ss. 'Koning Willem I' of the Stoomvaart Maatschappij 'Nederland' (SMN) was launched at the wharf of the Koninklijke Maatschappij 'De Schelde' in Vlissingen. The baptism was performed by Mrs. C.D. van Teylingen- Op ten Noort. (Source: K. de Haas: 'Januari 1900: slecht begin voor de SMN' in: 'DBW' jrg. 55 nr. 11 (2000)). In 1913 she was sold to Cie. de Nav. Marocaine et Armenienne, Marseilles, and renamed Abda.

The SS 'Durham Castle' arrived in Southampton on 8 April 1908.
Fannie Levison Fannie Levison, Anna Korman and their daughters Sarah Levison and Edith Korman arrived in Southampton on 8 April 1908 from Durban, SA, with the ship Ships of the Union Castle Mail Steamship Company. There is a discrepancy here, but I assume that a mistake has been made somewhere, as the whole group that arrives in New York is here together on this ship. Either the arrival date for the Durham Castle, or the departure date for the New York is wrong.
The 'Durham Castle' was owned by Union-Castle Mail S.S. Company.
The ship was a 8217 gross ton ship, length 475.5ft x beam 56.8ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Accommodation for 230-1st and 250-3rd class passengers. Built by the Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co, Glasgow, she was delivered to the Union-Castle Mail SS Co in Feb.1904 for their intermediate London - South Africa service. In 1910 she was transferred to the Mombasa via the Cape route and remained in commercial service during the Great War, but was used as a troopship on the northern return voyages. Transferred to the East Africa via Suez service in 1931, she was disposed of to the Admiralty in 1939. On 26th Jan.1940 she was mined and sunk off Cromarty while in tow to Scapa Flow for use as a base accommodation ship. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, Union-Castle Line]

The SS 'New York' arrived in New York City on 12 April 1908.
Fannie Levison from Southhampton, England with Anna Korman and their children Sarah Levison and Edith Korman.
The 'New York' was owned by the American Line.
The "New York" was built by J. & G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1888 for the Inman line as the "City of New York". She was a 10,499 gross ton vessel with a clipper stem, length 527.6 ft x beam 63.2 ft, three funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 540-1st, 200-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers.
Launched on 15/3/1888, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 1/8/1888. In August 1892 she made a record crossing between Sandy Hook and Queenstown and on 8/2/1893 commenced her last Liverpool - New York voyage. On 22/2/1893 she went to the American Line and was put under the US flag. She was then renamed "New York" and her accommodation altered to carry 290-1st, 250-2nd and 725-3rd class passengers. On 25/2/1893 she sailed from New York on her first voyage to Southampton and commenced her last voyage on this service on 16/4/1898. She then became the US Armed Cruiser "Harvard" until 11/1/1899 when she resumed the New York - Southampton service as the "New York".
On 14/1/1899 her starboard engine broke down and was repaired at Southampton and she resumed service from Southampton - New York on 25/3/1899. On 20/4/1901 she left Southampton for her last voyage to Cherbourg and New York before being rebuilt with new triple expansion engines, number of funnels reduced to two, and her size increased to 10,798 tons. On 15/4/1903 she resumed the New York - Cherbourg - Southampton service and in 1913, her first class passenger accommodation was downgraded to second class. Commenced her last voyage Southampton - Cherbourg - New York on 1/8/1914 and was transferred to the New York - Liverpool run on 14/8/1914. In April 1918 she made her last run from Liverpool to New York and then became the US Transport "Plattsburg". On 19/2/1920 she resumed the New York - Plymouth - Southampton service as the "New York" and her masts were reduced to two. On 2/11/1920 she made her last run from Southampton to Cherbourg and New York and in 1921 was sold to the Polish Navigation Co. who retained her name and used her for one round voyage New York - Antwerp - Danzig - Southampton - Cherbourg - Brest - New York. She was then seized for debt and sold. In 1922 she went to the Irish American Line and later the same year to the United Transatlantic Line. On 10/6/1922 she left New York for the last time for the American Black Sea Line on a voyage to Naples and Constantinople where she was sold at auction by order of the US government, and was scrapped at Genoa in 1923.
Source: North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.244).

The 'Grotius' travelled on ]D] from Batavia to Amsterdam.
Mar Broekman from Batavia.
The 'Grotius' was owned by the Stoomvaart Maatschappij 'Nederland'.
The Grotius was build in 1907 on the wharf Fijenoord in Rotterdam for the Stoomvaart Mij. 'Nederland' in Amsterdam. She was 128 m long, capacity 5.8 ton, and could accomodate 197 passagers. In 1928 she was chartered by the Holland West-Afrika Lijn, and sold for scrap in 1931. She was scrapped in 1934 in Hendrik Ido Ambacht.

The 'Rindjani' travelled on ]D] from Amsterdam to Batavia.
Mar Broekman from Rotterdam with his wife Rosalia and son Frits.
The 'Rindjani' was one of four sisters of 4700 grt built by Royal Rotterdam Lloyd between 1904 and 1907. They were Ophir (1904-18), Wilis (1905-24), Rindjani (1907-1926) and Kawi 1907-1926. Wilis, Rindjani and Kawi were all sold to the Turkish State Shipping Co and survived into the 1950s. (Passengers as built:- 1st: 60, 2nd: 37, 3rd: 34, 4th:30).

The SS 'Amerika' arrived in New York City on 19 April 1914.
Kataryna Drabik with her children Josef, Pawel, Zofia, Marya, Adam, Karol and Josefa.
The SS 'Amerika' was owned by the Hamburg America Line.
The SS 'Amerika' of 1912 was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1905 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 22,225 gross ton ship, length 669ft x beam 74.3ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 386-1st, 150-2nd, 222-3rd and 1,750-4th class. She carried a crew of 577. Launched on 20/4/1905, she was the largest ship in the world at the time. On 11/10/1905 she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Dover, Cherbourg and New York. In 1907 she was rebuilt to 22,621 tons and on 4/10/1912 collided with and sank the British submarine B.2 off Dover with the loss of 15 lives. On 9/5/1914 she started her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York crossing and on 10/6/1914 she commenced Hamburg - Boulogne - Southampton - Boston sailings. Her last voyage to Boston commenced on 14/7/1914 (arr 24/7/1914) and she remained in Boston until April 1917 when she was seized by the US authorities, renamed AMERICA and was used as an army transport. Between 1917-18 she made 9 trooping voyages to France and on 14/7/1918 collided with and sank the British ship INSTRUCTOR with the loss of 16 lives. On Oct.15th 1918 she sank at Hoboken pier during coaling due to bad trim with the loss of 6 lives, and was refloated on 21/11/1918. She was laid up in September 1919 and on 20/1/1920 she sailed from New York via Panama to Vladivostock (arr 20/4/1920) and embarked 6,500 troops for Trieste via Suez. On 8/9/1920 she arrived in New York with 2,666 emigrants from the Mediterranean. In 1921 she was converted to oil fuel and chartered to US Mail with accommodation for 225-1st, 425-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers and on 25/6/1921 commenced sailing between New York, Plymouth, Cherbourg and Bremen and commenced her third and last voyage on this service on 27/8/1921. In late 1921 she went to the United States Line and commenced her first voyage for these owners on 28/9/1921 when she left New York for Plymouth, Cherbourg, Bremen, Southampton, Cherbourg, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She was reconditioned in June 1923 to 21,114 tons and with passenger accommodation for 692-cabin and 1,056-3rd class. On March 10th 1926 she was gutted by fire while being refitted at Newport News and was rebuilt to 21,329 tons, and with passenger accommodation for 835-cabin, 516-tourist and 3rd class. She resumed New York - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Bremen sailings on 21/3/1928 and on 25/8/1931 commenced her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York (arr 4/9/1931) crossing. She was then laid up in the reserve fleet at Chesapeake Bay until 1940 when she became a US army accommodation ship for 1,200 troops at St John's NF. In January 1941 she was renamed EDMUND B. ALEXANDER and became a troop transport between New Orleans and Panama. At this time she was only capable of 10 knots and in 1942-3 was rebuilt with one funnel, her mast heights reduced and her engines converted by the Bethlehem Steel Corp, Baltimore to give her a speed of 17 knots. She then operated between New York and Europe with accommodation for 5,000 troops. In March 1946 she was altered to accommodate military dependents (904 adults and 314 children) between New York and Europe. In 1949 she was laid up at Baltimore and in 1951 in the Hudson River. In January 1957 she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Corp, towed to Baltimore and scrapped.
Source: North Atlantic Seaway bu N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.411] Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line.

The SS 'Frederick VIII' arrived in New York City on 5 February 1917.
Rivka Chartak with her sister Schone.
The SS 'Frederick VIII' was owned by the Scandinavian-American Line.
11,850 gross tons, length 523.5ft x beam 62.3ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 17 knots, accommodation for 250-1st, 300-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by AG Vulcan, Stettin, she was launched for the Scandinavian-American Line on 27th May 1913. Her maiden voyage started 5th Feb.1914 when she left Copenhagen for Christiania, Christiansand and New York. In Nov.1926 her accommodation was refitted for cabin and 3rd class and in Oct.1929 for cabin, tourist and 3rd class passengers. 22nd Nov.1935 last voyage Copenhagen - Oslo - Christiansand - New York (dep.7th Dec.) - Christiansand - Oslo - Copenhagen. Sep.1936 sold and scrapped at Blyth.
Source: North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.1241 by N.R.P.Bonsor.

The 'Vondel' travelled on ]D] from Batavia to Amsterdam.
Rosalia Voss from Batavia with her son Frits.
The 'Vondel' was owned by the Stoomvaart Maatschappij 'Nederland'.
The ship was build in 1907 for the Stoomvaart Mij. 'Nederland' in Amsterdam. She was 128 m long, and had a capacity of 5866 grt. She had accomodation for 205 passagers. In 1927 she was chartered by the Holland West-Afrika Lijn, and she was scrapped in Hendrik Ido Ambacht in 1930.

The SS 'Zeeland' arrived in New York City on 6 October 1923.
Scmul Bieda together with his sister Ruchel.
The SS 'Zeeland' was owned by the Red Star Line.
Launched on 24th Nov.1900 by John Brown & Co., Glasgow as the Ships. for the Red Star Line, she was registered under the British flag. Specifications: 11,905 gross tons, length 561.6ft x beam 60.2ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 342-1st, 194-2nd and 626-3rd class passengers.
13th Apr.1901 first voyage Antwerp - New York, 5th Mar.1910 last voyage Antwerp - Dover - New York.
19th Apr.1910 chartered to White Star Line and started Liverpool - Boston sailings. She made her fourteenth and last sailing on this service in Sep.1911 and on 21st Oct.1911 resumed Antwerp - Dover - NY sailings for Red Star Line.
13th Jul.1912 transferred to Belgian registry but continued the same service. On 18th Jul.1914 she started her last voyage on this route and on 11th Sep.1914 returned to the British flag and began Liverpool - NY voyages. Chartered to White Star-Dominion Line, she was used from Nov.1914 on the Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal service. Dec.1914 Liverpool - Halifax - Portland. Her last voyage on this service started Jan.1915 and she was then transferred to the International Navigation Co., Liverpool and renamed NORTHLAND. Mar.1915 chartered to White Star - Dominion Line for their Liverpool - Halifax - Portland and Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal routes until becoming a troopship. In Aug.1916 she resumed the same services for White Star - Dominion Line until Feb.1919 when she was chartered to American Line and sailed Liverpool - Philadelphia for four round voyages. On 18th Aug.1920 she resumed the Antwerp - Southampton - NY service as the ZEELAND under the British flag for Red Star Line, starting her last voyage on 8th Oct.1926. 1927 sold to Atlantic Transport Line, renamed MINNESOTA and fitted with tourist class only accommodation. 30th Apr.1927 first voyage London - NY. 21st Sep.1929 last voyage London - NY. 1930 scrapped at Inverkeithing.
Source: North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2, p.855 by N. Bonsor]
 

Citations

  1. From: Winthrop's Journal, "History of New England" 1630-1649, James Kendall Hosmer, Ed. (New York: Scribner, 1908), vol. 1, p. 53